Pets

What are Pets?

You might have heard this question a lot of times. However, the definition of pets highly depends on who is asking and who is providing the answer.

A simple search on Google and Wikipedia will say that a pet or “companion animal” is an animal that is kept primarily for a person’s company and entertainment.

Generally, this is the simplest answer that you can actually get for the term. However, a pet owner that focuses more on what pets really are would further provide more details on what it really means.

Dogs as Pets

We at The Project Pets focus on what our Pets really mean to us. We’ll be tackling most of the questions that are being asked when it comes to What, Which, Why, and How our pets really matter in our daily lives.

A pet, or companion animal, is an animal kept as a friend and/or for companionship. The types of animals that are considered as pets are usually domesticated animals such as:

The term “pet” has been used to describe the relationship between humans and other species since ancient times. The earliest known written reference of pets comes from Egypt in 3000 BC where it was mentioned that people would keep lions and leopards as household pets or service animals. In Ancient Greece, Aristotle wrote about keeping peacocks and peahens as pets, while Pliny the Elder described how he had trained his dog to fetch water.

During the Middle Ages, many European kings owned large numbers of domestic animals.

In modern society, most households have at least one pet; however, there are still some who choose not to own any pets. Some may find this choice difficult because they feel guilty if their friends ask them why they don’t have a pet. Others may think that having a pet will take up too much time and money. Still others may believe that owning a pet requires more work than they want to put into caring for another living creature. However, these reasons are often just excuses for those who really don’t care enough to make the effort necessary to provide proper care for a pet.

Health benefits

Housepets, particularly dogs and cats in industrialized societies are also highly adoptable animals. Pets provide companionship and emotional support to humans. They help reduce stress levels and improve moods with the bond between people. Pet animals, regardless of animal breed, also serve as a reminder of childhood memories and teach responsibility.

In addition, they offer unconditional love and loyalty. A study published in 2014 suggested that having a pet could lower blood pressure among older adults. Another study reported that elderly patients who were more attached to their pets experienced less depression after surgery.

Behavioral Problems

Some behavioral issues occur naturally while others develop due to environmental factors. For example, separation anxiety occurs when a pet animal becomes distressed upon leaving familiar surroundings.

It often manifests itself through whining, barking, pacing, chewing on things, digging holes, urinating outside, hiding under furniture, biting people, etc.

Other common behavior of animals include aggression towards strangers, fearfulness around loud noises, destructive behavior, hyperactivity, obsessive compulsive disorder, and phobias.

 

Behavioral disorders can become problematic if left untreated. In extreme cases, these conditions can result in death. Fortunately, many behavioral problems respond well to treatment. Talk to your veterinarian about how best to manage any problem behaviors. He/She can help determine whether medication would be beneficial. Medications used to treat aggressive animals vary depending on the type of issue involved.